Hanna Ingber

A journalist and kitten-lover living in Boston

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Two of the #kittens had to visit Dr Doyle b/c their tendons or ligaments aren’t growing properly. She says they will be fine with time.

Two of the #kittens had to visit Dr Doyle b/c their tendons or ligaments aren’t growing properly. She says they will be fine with time.

Filed under kittens

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Pangea interviews me about GlobalPost’s new Twitter series, “A Friday In.”

Here’s more from the show:

In the interview, Hanna, who spent two years reporting from India before landing at GlobalPost, takes us behind the website’s social media curtain. Topics discussed include:  how @Sweden inspired GlobalPost’s approach, what it means to cover global breaking news, the importance of having a conversational tone on Twitter (even for a brand!), and more.

Filed under social media journalism

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Got a new batch of foster kittens from Boston’s Animal Rescue League. They’re five-week-old sisters who lost their mom. I brought them into GlobalPost for some Friday cheer. Photo by Kyle Kim

Got a new batch of foster kittens from Boston’s Animal Rescue League. They’re five-week-old sisters who lost their mom. I brought them into GlobalPost for some Friday cheer. Photo by Kyle Kim

Filed under kittens animals cats

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As of Monday, journalists in Myanmar no longer have to submit their articles to state censors prior to publication, a practice that had been strictly enforced for nearly 50 years.

It is important to note that restrictions still exist in Myanmar by which the state can jail a journalist for writing something deemed inappropriate. But the lifting of formal press censorship is never the less a significant milestone on the road to reform. 

I worked at the Myanmar Times in Yangon from 2003-2004. GlobalPost’s Stacey Leasca interviews me to discuss censorship in Myanmar, the new policy and what obstacles remain.

See this graphic on reforms in Myanmar.

Filed under Burma Myanmar journalism press freedom

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Starting this Friday, GlobalPost’s Twitter feed is showcasing the voices and personal experiences of our correspondents based around the world.
In a project called “A Friday In …,” a different correspondent based internationally is taking over the @GlobalPost account and tweeting about his or her travels and daily activities. 
GlobalPost’s Patrick Winn kicks off our series with A Friday in Bangkok. Here’s his guided tour through one of the city’s massive wet markets.

Starting this Friday, GlobalPost’s Twitter feed is showcasing the voices and personal experiences of our correspondents based around the world.

In a project called “A Friday In …,” a different correspondent based internationally is taking over the @GlobalPost account and tweeting about his or her travels and daily activities.

GlobalPost’s Patrick Winn kicks off our series with A Friday in Bangkok. Here’s his guided tour through one of the city’s massive wet markets.

Filed under travel Twitter social media Bangkok Thailand

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@GlobalPost introduces "A Friday In ..."

Starting this Friday, GlobalPost’s Twitter feed will showcase the voices and personal experiences of our correspondents.

In a project called “A Friday In …,” a different correspondent based internationally will take over the @GlobalPost account and tweet about his or her travels and daily activities.

We invite you to ask our featured correspondent questions about what’s happening in his or her part of the world, make recommendations for where he or she could go, and give story tips.

The project starts this week with Patrick Winn (@BKKApologist), GlobalPost’s senior correspondent in Southeast Asia. Winn, who is based in Bangkok, will be visiting Klong Toei, a large slum in the city and one of Southeast Asia’s largest wet markets. He will get to Klong Toei by 11 p.m. EST tonight and start tweeting then.

Filed under Bangkok Thailand travel Twitter journalism social media

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Devastating video by a crew from Britain’s Channel 4 News who managed to get to Myanmar’s Rakhine State and talk to Rohingyas displaced by the violence.

The unnamed correspondent says of the villages destroyed during the violence: “It’s like looking at the aftermath of a natural disaster, except human beings did this.”

Found the video from Robert Mackey at The New York Times.

Filed under Burma Myanmar Rohingya